University of Texas
1890 School of Physics Report
Professor Alexander Macfarlane

 

 

Alexander Macfarlane


Entries from Course Catalog

Year 1883-84 Page 29

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS
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ve Geometry, Puckle's Conic Sections, Wood's Co-ordinate Geometary, Peck's Calculus, Courtenay's or Byerly's Calculus, Todhunter's Theory of Equations, Aldis' Solid Geometry, Elements des Determinants par Doster, Quaternions by Kelland and Tate or Hardy.
In applied mathematics, Mechanique de l'Ecole Polytechnique par Sturm, with selections from Airy and Tait.

VI. SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS

PROF. MALLET. Assistant, J. J. ATKINSON*.

In this department there will be a general course of Lectures on Experimental Physics, and one on Chemistry (inorganic and organic), with practical instructions for working students in the Laboratory.
The principal book used will be Ganot's Elementary Treatise on Physics (translated by Atkinson), last American edition, and Fownes' Manual of Chemistry. last American edition by Bridges.
Others will from time to time be recommended for reference.

*J. J. Atkinson was born in Ireland about 1863, supposedly immigrated in 1885, however, as we see here, he was in Texas in 1883-84. In 1910, he is living in Houston, TX, is widowed and working as a railroad clerk. There may have been a daughter, Josephine, born about 1888.

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Year 1883-84, Page 37-38

University of Texas
VII.---SCHOOL OF PHYSICS.

I Class.---In this class the section will be confined to the study of Experimental Meteorology.
II Class.---This class will continue to pursue the course of Physics by study of Heat, Magnetic Electricity and Meteorology, through one session.
III Class.---In this class special subjects for advanced study will be selected according with the needs and aims of the applicants. Applicants for the degree if M. A., entering this class, must have completed the courses of study of Classes I and II, in this institution or their equivalent elsewhere.
TEXT BOOKS.---Ganot's Physics (Atkinson's translation, latest American edition.)
To enter the school with advantage the student should be thoroughly prepared in Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry and Plain Trigonometry.
As soon as suitable facilities for laboratory work be provided, such work will be required of students of Class II applying for the degree of B. S. and of all students of Class III.

 

 

Year 1884-85

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS
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VII.--SCHOOL OF PHYSICS

Prof. Harrison

FIRST CLASS.--In this class the work will be confined to the study of Experimental Mechanics.
SECOND CLASS.--This class will continue the course in Physics by the study of Heat, Magnetism, Electricity, and Meteorology.
THIRD CLASS.--In this class special subjects for advanced study will be selected in accordance with the needs and aims of students.
TEXT-BOOK.--Ganot's Physics (Atkinson's translation, latest American edition).
To enter the School with advantage the student should be thoroughly prepared in Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, and Plane Trigonometry.
As soon as suitable facilities for laboratory work are provided, such work will be required of students of the Second Class applying for the Degree of B. Sc., and of all students of the Third Class.
The text-books used are Ganot's Physics, translated by Atkinson, and Macfarlane's Physical Arithmetic. The physical museum contains all the apparatus requisite to illustrate this course in a thorough manner. The order in which the several branches are taken up is as follows:

J U N I O R YE A R .

FIRST TERM. ---Heat.
SECOND TERM.---Sound, Light.

ADVANCED COURSE IN NATURAL PHILOSOPHY.

This course is intended for graduate students. The text-books used are Tait and Steele's Dynamics of a Particle and Thomson and Tait's Treatise on National Philosophy.

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING.

As soon as a physical laboratory is equipped, students of the Senior Class will be required to go through a course of instruction in physical manipulation and measurement, and students who have completed that course satisfactorily will have the opportunity of engaging in original investigation under the direction of the Professor.

GRADUATION THESIS.

Every candidate for a degree in the Academic Department is required to submit to the Faculty an approved thesis on some literary or scientific subject. This must be submitted to the Faculty at least one month before graduation.

PROFICIENCY.

Certificates of Proficiency will be conferred upon students who complete satisfactorily the maximum course required in any School for a Baccalaureate Degree. Those who complete such studies with distinction received Certificates of Distinguished Proficiency.

GRADUATE IN A SCHOOL.

A student who has completed in any School the course required therein for a Certificate of Proficiency, may enter into a Postgraduate course of study in that School, upon completion of which with distinction he will be entitled

 

Year 1883-84, Page 37
University of Texas

FOURTH YEAR.

Lectures on Technological Chemistry throughout the year.
In the laboratory those students who take Chemistry as their chief study will prepare an original dissertation on some subject in organic or Technological Chemistry.
The laboratory will be open every day from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. First year students will spend two hours a week in the laboratory, second year students, twelve hours, third year students fourteen hours, and fourth year students as much time as possible.
Students of the University not in the chemical department, and others, who may desire to take a special course of analytical chemistry, may do so with the sanction of the faculty and the professor in charge. Special facilities will be offered to advanced students wishing to engage in research, and to professional men who desire to extend their knowledge of chemistry.
The University has the beginning of a well-selected chemical library which will be open to the students at proper times.
The principal foreign and American chemical journals on the shelves of the library offer to the advanced students all the current literature of the science.

Year 1883-84, Page 37-38

University of Texas
VII.---SCHOOL OF PHYSICS.

I Class.---In this class the seeion will be confined to the study of Experimental Meteorology.
II Class.---This class will continue to pursue the course of Physics by study of Heat, Magnetic Electricity and Meteorology, through one session.
III Class.---In this class special subjects for advanced study will be selected according with the needs and aims of the applicants. Applicants for the degree if M. A., entering this class, must have completed the courses of study of Classes I and II, in this institution or their equivalent elsewhere.
TEXT BOOKS.---Ganot's Physics (Atkinson's translation, latest American edition.)
To enter the school with advantage the student should be thoroughly prepared in Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry and Plain Trigonometry.
As soon as suitable facilities for laboratory work be provided, such work will be required of students of Class II applying for the degree of B. S. and of all students of Class III.

 

Year 1885-86
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS
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The text-books used are Ganot's Physics, translated by Atkinson, and Macfarlane's Physics Arithmetic. The physical museum contains all the apparatus requisite to illustrate this course in a thorough manner. The order in which the several branches are taken up is as follows:

JUNIOR YEARS.

FIRST TERM.---Mechanics, Hydrostatics, Pneumatics.
SECOND TERM.---Sound, Light.

ADVANCED COURSE IN NATURAL PHILOSOPHY.

This course is intended for graduate students. The text-books used are Tait and Steele's Dynamics of a Particle and Thomson and Tait's Treatise on National Philosophy.

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING.

As soon as the requisite apparatus is obtained, the Professor will give a course of lectures on the application of electricity, for the benefit of students of engineering and such other students as wish to make electricity a special study.

PHYSICAL LABORATORY.

As soon as a physical laboratory is equipped, students of the Senior Class will be required to go through a course of instruction in physical manipulation and measurements, and students who have completed that course satisfactorily will

Year 1885-86

have the opportunity of engaging in original investigation under the direction of the Professor.

GRADUATION THESIS.

Every candidate for a degree in the Academic Department is required to submit to the Faculty an approved thesis on some literary or scientific subject. This must be submitted to the Faculty at least one month before graduation.

PASS CERTIFICATES

Pass Certificates will be given to students of any School who complete satisfactorily the studies of a class of lower grade than the maximum course required for a Baccalaureate Degree. Those who complete such studies with distinction will receive Certificates of Distinguished Proficiency.

GRADUATE IN A SCHOOL.

A student who has completed in any School the course required therein for a Certificate of Proficiency, may enter the PostGraduate course of study in that School, upon completion of which with distinction. He will be entitled
Year 1886-87Page 62

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS
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Degree. The great physical works will be studied---Thomson and Tait's Treatise on Natural Philosophy, Clerk-Maxwell's Electricity and Magnetism, Fourier's Treatise on Heat, etc.

GRADUATION THESIS.

Every candidate for a degree in the Academic Department is required to submit to the Faculty an approved thesis on some literary or scientific subject. This must be submitted to the Faculty at least one month before graduation.

PASS CERTIFICATES.

Pass Certificates will be given to students of any School who complete satisfactorily the studies of any class of lower grade than the maximum course required for a Baccalaureate Degree. Those who complete such studies with distinction will be entitled to Honor Certificates. These certificates will be signed by the Professor in charge of the School, and will be given to the successful students on application to the Secretary of the Faculty.

PROFICIENCY.

Certificates of Proficiency in a School will be conferred up students who complete satisfactorily the maximum course required in any School for a Baccalaureate Degree. Those who complete such studies with distinction will receive Certificates of Distinguished Proficiency.

Year 1886-87

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS

VII.---SCHOOL OF PHYSICS

PROFESSOR MACFARLANE.

e Physical School there is provided a suite of rooms on the south side of the first floor. In the centre is the physical museum, and communicating with it on the west side is the lecture theatre, and on the east the physical laboratory there is a also a small room adjoining which has been fitted up for photography. The lecture theatre is lighted from the south and west; it can seat one hundred persons, and has been fitted up with every convenience for experiments. The museum contains not only a complete equipment of lecture apparatus, but also a well selected equipment of measuring instruments. It is proposed to equip the physical laboratory with a dynamo and engine and numerous electrical appliances.
In the School of Physics there are three undergraduate courses of study---an elementary course in Experimental Physics, a course in NaturalPhilosophy, and a special course in Electrical Engineering.

COURSE IN EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS.

This course extends over Freshman and Sophomore Years. The text book used is Ganot's Physics translated by Atkinson. The physical museum contains all the apparatus requisite to illustrate this course in a thorough manner. The order in which the several branches of physics science are taken up is as follows:

FRESHMAN YEAR.

FIRST TERM.---Mechanics, Hydrostatics, Pneumatics.
SECOND TERM.---Heat, Sound.


 

Year 1889-90, Page 64

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS
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A small room (M), 6x8 feet next to the balance room is fitted up as a spectroscope root. Two spectroscopes are used, one a moderately fine instrument, the other a large combination spectroscope recently ordered from Europe.
The two small rooms (N and P) next to the smaller laboratory are used for storage.
The School of Chemistry possesses a small but well selected library of from 300 to 400 volumes, embracing some of the best German, French, and English journals and books. This library is accessible to the students at all times.

IX. SCHOOL OF PHYSICS

PROFESSOR MACFARLANE.

Assistant in Laboratory, B. S. BROWN*.

For the School of Physics, there is provided a suite of rooms on the south side of the first floor. In the center is the physical museum, and communicating with it on the west side is the lecture room, and on the east the physics laboratory. There is also a small room adjoining, which has been fitted up for photography. The lecture room is lighted from the south and west; it can seat one hundred persons, and it has been fitted up with every convenience for experiments. The museum contains not only a complete equipment of lecture apparatus, but also a well selected equipment of measuring instruments. It is proposed to equip the physical laboratory with a dynamo and engine and numerous electrical appliances.
In the School of Physics there are three undergraduate courses of study---an elementary course in Experimental Physics, a course in Mathematical Physics, and a special course in Electrical Engineering.

*B. S. Brown was a fellow in Biology and earned a BA in 1890.

Year 1889-90, Page 65

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS
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COURSE IN EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS.

This course extends over Freshman and Sophomore Years. The text book used is Ganot's Physics translated by Atkinson. The physical museum contains all the apparatus requisite to illustrate this course in a thorough manner. The order in which the several branches of physics science are taken up is as follows:

FRESHMAN YEAR.

FIRST TERM.---Mechanics, Hydrostatics, Pneumatics.
SECOND TERM.---Electricity and Magnetism.

SOPHOMORE YEAR

FIRST TERM.--Light.
SECOND TERM.---Heat, Sound.

JUNIOR YEAR.

Students who take this course must have a working knowledge of Algebra, as the exact portions of Physics Science will be studied.
The students of the Junior Class are required to go through a course of instruction in physics manipulation and measurement, and those who complete that course satisfactorily will have the opportunity of engaging in original investigation under the direction of the Professor.
TEXT BOOKS.---Macfarlane's Physical Arithmetic, Chute's Practical Physics, and Macfarlane's Elementary Mathematics.
Year 1889-90Page 66

SENIOR YEAR.

The Professor will give a series of lectures on the applications of electricity, for the benefit of students of engineering and any who wish to make electricity a special study. Regular students will supplement attendance on the lectures by work in the laboratory.

ADVANCED COURSE IN MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS

This course is intended for those who choose the Science course giving special prominence to Physics, and for graduates who choose the Experimental Sciences in studying for a Master's Degree. Some of the great physical works will be studied, as Thomson and Tait's Treatise on Natural Philosophy, Clerk-Maxwell's Electricity and Magnetism, Fourier's Treatise on Heat, etc.

X. SCHOOL OF GEOLOGY

PROFESSOR SIMONDS.

(1) THE GENERAL COURSE IN GEOLOGY.

Lectures on Physiography, Structural and Dynamic Geology, are given three times a week during the first term of the Junior Year, accompanied by frequent examinations, both oral and written. During the Second Term, Historical and Economic Geology are treated in a similar manner. Whenever possible the instruction is supplemented by the study of specimens, maps and special reports in the laboratory, and excursions in the field. Attendance upon these lectures is prescribed for all students in the General Scientific Course, the course giving prominence to Engineering, and that giving prominence to Geology.

(2) SPECIAL COURSES.

Provision is made for students who have completed the
Year ???

Conductors.

WINTER TERM.---Electric Lighting and Transmission of Power.
SPRING TERM.---Telegraphy and Telephony.
TEXT-BOOKS.---Ayrton's Practical Electricity; Mendenhall's Century of Electricity.

POST-GRADUATE COURSE

The course in Advanced Mathematical Physics is intended for those who choose the Science course giving special prominence to Physics, or for graduates who choose Physics as one of their studies for the degree of Master of Arts. The following works are studied: Thomson and Tait's Treatise on Natural Philosophy; Clerk-Maxwell's Electricity and Magnetism; Fourier's Treatise on Heat, etc.

Year 1892-93 Page 85

Note: First evidence of graduate work.
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS
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SCHOOL OF PHYSICS
PROFESSOR MACFARLANE.
Assistant in Laboratory, G. H. WOOTEN*

For the School of Physics there is provided a suite of rooms on the south side of the first floor. In the center is the physical museum, and communicating with it on the west side is the lecture, and on the east the physical Laboratory. The lecture room is lighted from the south and west; it can seat one hundred persons, and it has been fitted up with every convenience for experimental demonstration. The museum contains in addition to the lecture apparatus a small equipment of measuring instruments.
In the School of Physics there are three courses of study: An elementary course in three undergraduate courses in Experimental Physics, extending over the Freshman and Sophomore Years; a course in Mathematical Physics, extending over the Junior Year; and a course in the applications of Electricity, extending over the Senior Year. There is also a Post-Graduate course in advanced Mathematical Physics.

FRESHMAN YEAR.

FALL TERM.---Mechanics.
WINTER TERM.---Hydrostatics and Pneumatics.
SPRING TERM.---Electricity and Magnetism.
TEXT BOOK.---Ganot's Treatise on Physics or Deschanel's Treatise on Natural Philosophy.

SOPHOMORE YEAR.

FALL TERM.---Light.
WINTER TERM.---Heat.
SPRING TERM.---Sound.
TEXT-BOOK.---Ganot's Treatise on Physics or Deschanel's Treatise on Natural Philosophy.

*Goodall Harrison Wooten was born in Paris, Texas, on November 28, 1869, the son of Dr. Thomas Dudley Wooten and Henrietta Goodall. His siblings included W. G., a lawyer, Etta, Stella, Mad, Tommie(f), and Joseph, a physician. His father, a Confederate veteran and physician, was one of the original members of the University of Texas Board of Regents and served as president of the Board for many years. The son, Goodall thus grew up in a family who fostered pride and interest in the University of Texas. In 1872, the family moved to Austin which was Goodall Wooten’s home for seventy years. He attended private and public schools in Austin. Goodall Harrison Wooten attended the University of Texas, where he earned a Bachelor's, 1891 and Master's degrees 1892. He attended the medical school in Galveston and in 1895 graduated from the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. He established a medical practice in Austin, and in 1897, married Ella Newsome (1878–1972) of McKinney, Texas. She was a daughter of W. B. Newsome, a banker and wealthy planter. Their children were Thomas Dudley, Jr., and Lucy..

Construction of a new home began in 1898 and was completed in January 1900. Designed by Dallas architect Charles O'Connell, it soon became an Austin landmark and was known for the extensive gardens planted by Ella Wooten. Renovations in 1910 changed the simple house into a grand Classical Revival mansion, and it remains one of the premier examples of that style in Austin. Prominent features of Goodall Wooten house include its handsome brick and stonework, wraparound gallery, balustrade, and massive two-story paired columns with ionic capitals. It is typical of the large-scale homes built in this neighborhood at the turn of the century. The house remained in the Wooten family until 1944. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark-1990.

The Boy Scouts of the Austin area will long remember Goodall Wooten as one of their greatest benefactors. He was at all times active and interested in the Boy Scouts movement and was a friend and classmate of Lyman J. Bailey, who organized the first scout troop in Austin. In 1934, Dr. Wooten purchased, for $5,000, the Champion site, overlooking Bull Creek. The same year he presented these 125 acres to the Boy Scouts of Central Texas for use as a camp site. He also had a well dug on the property and gave more land and gifts for the camp. In this way the campaign for construction of cabins, buildings and improvements for a first class scout camp was begun. The camp was named the Tom D. Wooten Boy Scout Camp after Dr. Wooten’s only son who died in his youth.

Dr. Wooten served on the board of the Austin Chamber of Commerce for several years and served as president for the 1936-1937 term and again in 1938-1939. He had a great pride in and love for Austin and was active in promoting civic and cultural growth of the city. In the early 1930’s he was named Austin’s “Most Worthy Citizen”, an honor bestowed annually on an outstanding Austin citizen. Dr. Wooten retired in the late 1930’s. He died at his home, on the corner of 19th and Rio Grande, on January 30th, 1942 and is is buried in Oakwood Cemetery Annex in Austin Texas, Plot: Section G.

It seemed fitting that the Austin School Board would name one of its schools for this man who gave so much in time and work as well as material wealth to the youth of Austin. The Goodall Wooten Elementary School was built in 1955 to honor the memory of a great man who gave so much to Austin. Wooten Hall at the University of Texas is named in his honor.

It would be hard to state whether Dr. Goodall Wooten was best known as a physician, philanthropist, or friend of education. For nearly forty years he was a beloved physician in Austin, ministering to the physical needs of many. During this time he was also active in promoting work of the Boy Scouts thru gifts and personal interest. He served as president of the Austin Chamber of Commerce for two terms and was zealous in trying to make Austin a better and more beautiful city. His interest in education was evident in his active and loyal support of the University of Texas, of which he was an ex-student, and through his efforts in helping found the Texas Memorial Museum.

Year 1890-91 Page 51

DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE SCIENCE AND ARTS

the Junior Year; and a course in the Applications of Electricity, extending over the Senior Year. There is also a Graduate course in advanced Mathematical Physics.

FRESHMAN YEAR.

FALL TERM.---Mechanics.
WINTER TERM.---Hydrostatics and Pneumatics.
SPRING TERM.---Electricity and Magnetism.
TEXT-BOOKS.---Ganot's Treatise on Physics or Deschanel's Treatise on Natural Philosophy.

SOPHOMORE YEAR.

FALL TERM.---Light.
WINTER TERM.---Sound.
SPRING TERM.---Heat.
TEXT-BOOKS.---Ganot's Treatise on Physics or Deschanel's Treatise on Natural Philosophy.

JUNIOR YEAR.

FALL TERM.---Kinematics.
WINTER TERM.---Dynamics.
SPRING TERM.---Heat, Light, Sound.
TEXT-BOOKS.---Macfarlane's Physical Arithmetic; Chute's Practical Physics; Marfarlane's Elementary Mathematical Tables.
This course requires two hours in the lecture room and three hours in the laboratory per week.

SENIOR YEAR.

FALL TERM.---History of Electrical Discovery; Lightning Conductors.
WINTER TERM.---Telegraphy and Telephony.
SPRING TERM.---Electric Lighting and Transmission of Power.
TEXT-BOOK.---Ayrton's Practical Electricity.

Year 1891-92, Page 50
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS

provided for thirty-seven students. Adjoining this room is also a gas room similar to the one on the first floor.
Across the hall from the quantitative laboratory is the balance room. It is provided with analytical balances. Adjoining the balance room is a small room designed for spectroscopic work, gas analysis and the like. It has not yet been furnished.
The lecture room 35x40 feet can accommodate one hundred and twenty students. It is large, well ventilated and well lighted and is furnished with all the usual appliances found in a chemical lecture room.
Besides these rooms there are on this same floor a small laboratory 12x21 feet, the private laboratory of the Professor of Chemistry, and his private office. The last contains the library belonging to the School of Chemistry. The library numbers some five hundred volumes, embracing some of the best German, French and English journals and books. It is designed to make this a working library and it is accessible to the students at all times.

prominence to Physics, or for graduates who choose Physics as one of their studies for the degree of Master of Arts. It comprises a course of lectures on Vector Algebra, and the following works are studied: Thomson & Tait's Treatise on Natural Philosophy; Clerk-Maxwell's Electricity and Magnetism; Fourier's Treatise on Heat, etc.
TEXT-BOOK.---Macfarlane's Algebra of Physics.

XI. SCHOOL OF PHYSICS.

PROFESSOR MACFARLANE.

Fellow, G. H. WOOTEN.

For the School of Physics there is provided a suite of rooms on the south side of the first floor. In the center is the physical museum, and communicating with it on the west side is the lecture room, and on the east the physical laboratory. The lecture room is lighted from the south and west; it can seat one hundred persons, and it has been fitted up with every convenience for experimental demonstration. The museum contains in addition to the lecture apparatus a small equipment of measuring instruments.
In the School of Physics there are three undergraduate courses of study: an elementary course in Experimental Physics, extending over the Freshman and Sophomore Years; a course in Mathematical Physics, extending over


Year 1892-93 Page 63

PHYSICS:
1.Mechanics and Electricity (full course). 3
Two lectures and a recitation weekly. This is an experimental course, and is intended to give an exact knowledge of the fundamental principles of the great sciences of Mechanics and Electricity.

2.Light, Heat and Sound (full course). 3
Two lectures and a recitation weekly. This is an experimental course. A knowledge of the elements of Plane Trigonometry is required.

3.Quantitative Physics (full course). 3
Two recitations a week on the units and exact laws of Physics; three hours a week in the physical laboratory.

4.Applications of Electricity (full course). 3
One hours a week is devoted to lectures on the applications of electricity, another to recitation on a text-book of practical electricity, and a third to making measurements with such electrical instruments as the physical cabinet contains.

5.Mechanical Physics (full course.) 3
Lectures on the ideas and principles of exact physics, following the Professor's Principles of the Algebra of Physics. The work done fits a student to read any of the classical physical works, and is particularly suitable for those who wish to make a specialty of physics or mathematics. To enter this course a knowledge of Analytical Geometry and of the Differential Calculus is required.

6.Mathematical Physics (full course). 3
Classical works on the several branches of Physics are read such as Clerk-Maxwell's Electricity, Fourier's Heat, La Grange's Mecanique Analytique, etc.

 

 

TABULAR VIEW OF COURSES _____________________________________________________

School. Fall Term. Winter Term. Spring Term.
______________________________________________________
BIOLOGY1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Full course, 3
2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " " 3 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " " 3
CHEMISTRY1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " " 3
2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " " 3
3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " " 3
4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " " 3
5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " " 3
6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/3 course, 1
ENGLISH1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2/3 course, 2
2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1/3 course, 1
3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2/3 course, 3
4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1/3 course, 3
5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1/3 course, 3
6Not given " "
in 1893-4. " " 3
7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2/3 course, 3
8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Full " 3
9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " " 3
10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " " 3
11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/3 course, 2
12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " " 2
GEOLOGY1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Full " 3
2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2/3 course, 3
3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/3 " 3
4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2/3 course, 2
5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/3 " 3
Year 1891-92Page 52
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS

 

 

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